Report Ranks which States are Toughest on Drunk Drivers

Posted by Jon Ibanez on June 22nd, 2015

Wallethub.com, a financial services website, has attempted to rank states based on how tough and lenient their laws are on DUI offenders.

Wallethub cited a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration statistic that 31 percent of motor vehicle fatalities in 2012 involved alcohol impairment. This number, however, has dropped significantly since 1980 when states began taking a serious stance on drunk driving. The reason for the decline, according to Wallethub, is the tough laws and penalties that states have enacted to combat and punish drunk driving.

Using a point system, states were ranked depending on if and how that state imposed a certain DUI laws.

For example, states were given 10 points if the law required at least 10 days in jail for a first offense, eight points for eight to nine days in jail, six points for six to seven days in jail, four points for four to five days in jail, two points for two to three days in jail, and zero points for zero to one day in jail. 

Other assessments included whether the state imposed additional penalties if a drunk driver had a high blood alcohol content, the range in fines and fees, the range in "administrative" license suspension, and whether an ignition interlock device was required following a DUI conviction.

So how did the states fare?

Arizona, according to Wallethub, is the toughest state on drunk driving.

Amongst some of its penalties include the following:  Arizona requires a minimum of 10 days in jail for a first time DUI and a minimum of 90 days in jail for a second DUI. A DUI automatically becomes a felony on the third offense. A DUI conviction will lead to a three month administrative license suspension. An ignition interlock device is mandatory for 12 months upon a first conviction.

South Dakota, on the other hand, came in dead last when it came to laws punishing drunk drivers.

Some of South Dakota’s DUI penalties (…or lack thereof) include some of the following:  The state does not have a minimum jail term for either a first time DUI or a second time DUI. A DUI automatically becomes a felony on the third offense. There is no administrative license suspension nor is a person required to install an ignition interlock device is required upon a DUI conviction.

And how did sunny California do?

California came in 31st with some of its laws including the following: California requires a minimum of two days in jail for a first time DUI conviction and a minimum of 10 days for a second time DUI conviction. A DUI becomes a felony on the fourth offense. A person convicted of a DUI in California faces a four month administrative license suspension.

Although Wallethub indicated that California does not require an ignition interlock device upon a first time DUI conviction, some counties in California, Los Angeles included, do in fact require an ignition interlock device.

Wallethub’s report can be found here: http://wallethub.com/edu/strictest-states-on-dui/13549/

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