Category Archives: DUI Law

MADD Continues Staffing DUI Roadblocks

A few weeks ago I posted a story about Mothers Against Drunk Driving assisting Delaware law enforcement in manning DUI sobriety checkpoints (and, in Tennessee, even setting up their own roadblocks).  The practice appears to be spreading.  The following is from a recent San Diego County Sheriff news release:

SANTEE.  The Santee Sheriff's Traffic Division is turning up the heat on drunk drivers this weekend.  Those who choose to drink and drive may find themselves cooling off in a jail cell.

In cooperation with Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD), the Santee Sheriff's deputies will be conducting a DUI sobriety checkpoint on Friday, September 13th, at an undisclosed location within the city limits….

Sheriff's deputies, senior volunteers, reserves and representatives of MADD staff DUI Sobriety Checkpoints.

When did you start "cooling off in a jail cell" for drinking and driving (which is not illegal)?  And when did MADD begin staffing roadblocks? 

I've posted in the past about the ineffectiveness (and unconstitutionality) of DUI roadblocks.  So how effective are these Sherrif/MADD joint efforts?  Well, the same news release reports that the  preceding effort resulted in 1169 drivers encountered at the roadblock, of which 556 were waived through, 613 were stopped, 50 were asked to step out for further investigation….and only 1 was arrested for DUI

However, local government coffers were fattened with 27 citations and 10 impounded vehicles — an apparently growing reason behind roadblocks supposedly set up to find drunk drivers.

 

 

(Thanks to Jeanne M. Pruett, President of Responsibility in DUI Laws, Inc.)

New Data: DUI Roadblocks Don’t Work

In previous posts I've commented upon the ineffectiveness of DUI roadblocks. Yet, MADD continues to demand more and more of these wastes of law enforcement resources. Now this story:

Statistics spark debate on whether DUI checkpoints work

STOCKTON, Sept. 18 — Recently released federal data has prompted a beverage industry group to declare checkpoints ineffective and to push for more resources to be spent on patrols to prevent people from drinking and driving.

The National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration in August released data on alcohol-related deaths in 2003 and 2004. Last year saw a decline in fatalities, and most of the drop occurred in states that don't use sobriety checkpoints. That led the American Beverage Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based restaurant industry group, to proclaim checkpoints as an ineffective method in preventing alcohol fatalities.

"There were 411 fewer deaths in 2004, 394 of which were in nonroadblock states," said John Doyle, executive director of ABI. "It's a startling finding when you look at it through that filter."

California is one of 39 states that use checkpoints to prevent and catch drunken drivers. It also had 14 more fatalities in 2004 than 2003. All 11 states that don't use checkpoints — among them Oregon and Washington — reported a decrease in alcohol-related deaths….

"Checkpoints are successful, because they get the word out," said Officer Bill Sivley, a spokesman for Stockton CHP, adding that officers often give out informational pamphlets to motorists. "We will never know how many people were deterred from drinking and driving because of them."

Let's see….DUI roadblocks don't work — they may even increase fatalities — but we should have more of them because they "get the word out"?

MADD Sobriety Checkpoints?

A few days ago I posted a news story about MADD assisting police at DUI "sobriety checkpoints".  What I didn’t realize is that MADD apparently goes even further — setting up their own roadblocks! The following news story from a couple of years ago reports on one such roadblock:


CLINTON PROSECUTOR AT ODDS WITH MADD

A prosecutor in Clinton, Tennessee, says the president of the local chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving has been irresponsible.

Anderson County District Attorney General Jim Ramsey said a MADD roadblock June 28th caused a two-vehicle accident.

Further, he said the MADD chapter has interfered in criminal cases and been involved in publicity stunts.

MADD chapter president Susan Ford said the group stays within the policies and guidelines of the organization. She said she feels like the group has community support.


Presumably, MADD is not authorized to stop vehicles on the highways — in which case, why aren’t any of the mad mothers arrested and prosecuted?  They clearly pose a threat to public safety (and just as clearly are politically very powerful).


(Thanks to Jeanne Pruett, President of Responsibility in DUI Laws, Inc.)

MADD Helping Police at DUI Roadblocks?

From today’s news:

DOVER- The sixth week of Delaware’s "Checkpoint Strikeforce" campaign resulted in 22 arrests for DUI charges as well as the arrest of one man who is accused of trying to run down two volunteers from Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD). 

According to police reports, the driver refused to obey several police commands to stop the vehicle and roll down his window. According to the police, the driver then tried to flee the checkpoint and in the process nearly ran over two members of Delaware’s MADD chapter who were assisting police at the checkpoint….. 

I hope the two MADD mothers weren’t too frightened, but what I really want to know is:  When did MADD start "assisting" police administer DUI roadblocks?


(Thanks to Donald Ramsell of Wheaton, Illinois.)

Roadblocks for Fun and Profit (Continued)

In recent days I've talked about how DUI roadblocks (or to use the more politically correct term, "sobriety checkpoints") are ineffective and violate the Fourth Amendment but have nevertheless been authorized by the U.S. Supreme Court because the intrusion on citizens' privacy was outweighed by the "grave and legitimate interest in curbing drunken driving". And I pointed out that, inevitably, law enforcement was increasingly abusing the procedure to gather information about citizens, conduct dragnets for non-DUI offenses and raise money for local government.

In the following news story about a weekend "sobriety checkpoint" in North Carolina, notice the emphasis in the opening paragraph on the minimal arrests for DUI — and the real objective as evidenced by the list of total arrests in the last paragraph:

Area law enforcement officers levied charges against drunk driving suspects Friday at a checkpoint at the intersection of North Raleigh Street and Meadowbrook Road.

Rocky Mount police said two vehicles were seized from drivers charged at the checkpoint during a joint effort with area law enforcement agencies….

Arrests resulting from the checkpoint included the following charges: Driving while intoxicated, three; alcoholic beverage control violations, three; driving while license revoked, four; no operator's license, five; fail to carry license, three; seat belt violation, one; expired license plate, three; no insurance, one; unauthorized use of motor vehicle, one; misdemeanor possession of marijuana, one; possession with intent to sell/deliver marijuana (felony), one; felony maintain a vehicle, one; child restraint violation, six; inspection violation, three; careless and reckless driving, two; felony elude, two; fail to stop for lights and siren, one; outstanding warrants, three; commercial motor vehicle regulatory violation, two; resist, obstruct and delay, two.


(Thanks again to Jeanne Pruett.)